Ink Smith Publishing

Reviews, Reviews, Reviews!

Authors work tirelessly to bring readers into spectacular worlds. They stay awake for hours, they skip meals because they are ferociously typing away the most exciting murder scene you’ve ever read, or forgetting simple things like showers and their family.

Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 12.50.57 PM.pngThey work hard on marketing, readings, sending swag to readers, and anything else they can think of to get books into the hands of their fans. And fans, we read these books. These products of soul-wrenching work.

But, after we read these books, what then? They get shelved on our tablets and bookshelves and marked as READ on our Goodreads accounts. And then that’s it. We might mention the book in passing to a friend. We might reflect on our reading experience, maybe even take it down and read it again until it’s dog-eared and worn.

And the author goes back to work writing another one. And you wait for it. As the reader, we demand more of the worlds we enjoy escaping to. We stand in line, we pre-order, we devour.

Knowing this, knowing that as a voracious reader myself, I owe a little bit more to the author. Nothing too big, of course. I’ve bought their book, but that isn’t enough. If I love something, or hate it, or find it enlightening or enraging, then I should talk about it. I should leave a review so that other readers can engage in the conversation.

Reviews are one of the greatest gifts you could give to an author. Regardless of how you feel about the book, reviews encourage other readers to buy the book. Some of you are shaking your heads, saying, “Well if it is a bad review, won’t that hurt sales.” And my response to you is this: “Not always.”

Have you ever read an inflammatory comment on a Facebook post? What does it make you do? Well, for me, it makes me read. I read further. I love the discussions, the point of views. Personally, I’ve actually purchased a book based on the negative reviews it got. (It was The Warded Man by Peter V. Brett, in case you were wondering!) It had good reviews too, but I was really intrigued to purchase by the negative ones.

Check out the great reviews our newest addition to the Native Ink Press & Ink Smith Publishing, The Gorilla Picked Me! got on Goodreads. The book is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Ink Smith Publishing, and Native Ink Press websites! Available in Hardcover, Softcover, and e-book (e-book available on B&N and Amazon).

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About Corinne

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Corinne has her MFA in Writing from Lindenwood University and her MPS in Publishing from George Washington University. She has been an editor at Ink Smith Publishing and Native Ink Press since 2013. Since her first trip to the library when she was a toddler, Corinne has been collecting books, recommending her favorites and providing commentary on the less-than-stellar. Her belief is that if you have a problem, it’s nothing that a good book can’t solve. Currently, she is editing for Ink Smith Publishing & Junto Magazine and hoping that her blog posts here will help writers improve and publish their work.

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Need help hitting 50,000 for Nano?

Tips and Tricks: Increasing The Word Flow

We NaNoWriMoers are a little more than halfway through the challenge, but if you are
like me in any way, this is about the time I start hitting the wall. The pressure of words is
becoming a bit more challenging as you work through the plot you are hastily creating.
And the deadline is looming closer and closer with each passing day.
The start of the 30-day challenge is always exciting, and if I daresay, easy as you
choose your story-line and begin meeting your characters. But after the first few days the
inspiration begins to dry up and the nerves begin setting in. By the halfway point, we
wonder if there’s enough time left, and then we dread the story itself: is it even worth all
this effort? The answer: YES!
Nano is just the challenge to get 50,000 words completed (which is approximately a
novel, give or take). But you aren’t supposed to have a finished, polished novel by
December 1 sitting on your desk. Having that kind of pressure is daunting, and can
cause writers to detach themselves from their project and drop out of the Nano race.
Let’s be honest, we aren’t James Patterson.

 

But never fear, there are some tried and true tricks to keep your word count mounting.

1. DO NOT SCRAP ANYTHING
As noted before, this piece is not going to be a publishable work by Day 30. Instead, this
is a first draft. As writers, you need to keep that in mind as you go along. If you don’t like
a scene, leave it be, write something new after it and keep going. The more you go back
and delete pieces of the novel the more time you spend recreating scenes, and the less
time you spend advancing your plot.

2. DO NOT EDIT
At least not yet! Editing, while a necessary tool for polished work is not the goal for
NaNo. Make editing your December goal, and focus on getting the words down. Do not
go back and rewrite sections, instead, write more sections and keep the flow going.
Spending time each day going back to re-read entire chapters (heck, even the entire
book!) takes precious writing time away from you. In order to meet the deadline of
50,000 words in 30 days, writers have to average at least 1,700 words per day. That
doesn’t sound like a lot, but as you get into the nitty-gritty of the novel, there’s the
chance that some days you might not hit that mark, maybe one day you only hit 300
words, that puts you 1,400 words behind.

3. SCHEDULE SOME TIME
We all work, cook, have commitments, and need time to unwind. Make sure to set aside
a block of time to write. This block of time can be anywhere from 20 minutes to 2 hours,
whatever your schedule allows. But making yourself sit and write for that set time period
can get the juices flowing! Environment is also key. Make sure to select your writing
space based on your ability to block out noise. If you can’t stop yourself from looking up
at the T.V., getting involved in a conversation, or getting distracted by the pile of laundry
that needs folding, make sure you choose a location that is free of those distractions.

4. WRITING SPRINTS
These are a fun way to get the word count out in a certain amount of time. And you can
get other writers involved in them too! Pick a number of words you want to write and
then give yourself a time limit to get those words written. Or give yourself a time limit and
challenge your friends to write as many words as you can. The winner earns a free cup
of coffee! Post it to social media, text your writer buddies, or get your friends/family to
hold you accountable for these sprints!

5. REMOVE YOURSELF
Sometimes you place too much pressure on yourself to actually write the number of
words you need each day. The pressure builds and it squashes the inspiration. In these
cases, get up and get out. Head to a park, a mall, or some other public place and spend
time people watching. Give yourself an hour and write about where you are, what you
see, what you hear, about the people walking around, the smells…just jot it down, keep
your focus off your work in progress until something sparks you. This break allows your
mind to wander outside of the confines of your story line.

6. GET OFF THE COMPUTER
Sometimes working your magic with the basics are the best way to reinvigorate your
output. While typing allows you to get more words down in a shorter amount of time,
writing by hand allows your mind to work a bit slower. Use this time to develop a new
scene or character, or to give yourself a quick chapter outline.

7. OUTLINE
While passion gets you started on the Nano journey, you have to be dedicated to
finishing the job. Writing up a short, general outline can help keep you on track. This
provides you with the bare bones of the story and you can spend the rest of the writing
time filling in the organs!

8. STOP WRITING WHEN YOU KNOW WHAT IS COMING NEXT
Getting started each day can be a challenge if you aren’t sure what direction your
character is going to take later in the story. By ending your writing session at a point in
which you know exactly what your character is going to do next, you allow yourself to get
started immediately the next time you sit down and begin writing again. Jot down a few
notes before you finish writing for the day about what is going to happen in the next
chapter and stop writing. When you go back, your notes and your last few paragraphs
will be all you need to review before you can jump into the action of your WIP (work in
progress).

9. LEAVE BLANKS
Choosing a character name can take days, deciding on the correct phrasing to describe
the castle gates can be a challenge you spend hours creating, even attempting to vary
your descriptive language can take up more time than you’d like. Here’s the key when it
comes to Nano: leave it blank. The old adage, “collect the sand, build the castle later,”
applies here more than you an imagine. Who cares if you used the word SMILE thirty
times in the last twenty pages. That is a problem for you to address when you get to the
editing phase. That minor character that only appears once in the story for a few pages
doesn’t have a good name? So what, make one up, leave it blank, call him Minor
Character 4, and move on. Names can be decided upon at a later date. Not sure how to
describe the scar on the hero’s face? Write SCAR, DESCRIPTION, and keep writing the
action. This is a first draft, it isn’t supposed to be gold, it’s supposed to be raw. All the
boo-boos can be tended at a later date.

10. DO NOT GIVE UP
Even if you know you aren’t going to hit 50,000 by the end of November, keep writing.
Keep pushing yourself to write as much as you can. Then, use that success as a
challenge for yourself the following year. You might surprise yourself. You may sit down
one day, feel overly inspired, and write 8,000-10,000 words and put yourself back on
track to hit your goal. You can do it, you have the skills and the passion – you just need
the determination. (And a few good tips to stimulate those creative juices!)

 

11. EXTRA TIP
There are plenty of places to submit your work to when you’re done! Keep Junto Magazine in mind for your shorter pieces, and Ink Smith Publishing & Native Ink Press for your longer novels!

 

About Corinne

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Connect with me
on Twitter!
@AndersonCorinne

Corinne has her MFA in Writing from Lindenwood University and her MPS in Publishing from George Washington University. She has been an editor at Ink Smith Publishing and Native Ink Press since 2013. Since her first trip to the library when she was a toddler, Corinne has been collecting books, recommending her favorites and providing commentary on the less-than-stellar. Her belief is that if you have a problem, it’s nothing that a good book can’t solve. Currently, she is editing for Ink Smith PublishingJunto Magazine and hoping that her blog posts here will help writers improve and publish their work.

All About Lorna Brown!

Hey readers! This post is all about Lorna Brown, author of Debris, as a writer.

For starters, on the off chance she does have writer’s block, she battles the struggle by working on her other projects. She says she doesn’t get writer’s block often, but wouldn’t be too phased by it even if she did! Just turning on the news would inspire a story for her so it wouldn’t be too long before she had another project to work on!

Regarding her novel coming out Spring 2018, Debris started off as a completely different novel. The original novel was a story made of three parts and Andre was the main character in one of those stories. Most of the characters were the same, but their relationships were different and once Andre met Erin in the estate (instead of the minor character she was originally), everything changed. Lorna says “all the characters had already taken their place and had been waiting for Erin to come along and change the game).

One of the other projects she’s working on is set in her hometown in Sligo, Ireland. The stories are all connected and she has hopes to write another collection similar to this soon. As someone who also has a writer’s mind, I asked her if she carries a notebook with her in case inspiration strikes. She does not, she texts herself or writes herself a note in her phone (as I do too!). Recently, she read an interesting headline and emailed it to herself as an idea for a story. “Mexicans outraged after praying for faked trapped child” All weekend everyone was glued to the television watching the rescue of a 12-year-old named Frida Sofia, who never existed. She says the effect media has on the population as a whole, and how ideas can spread and wreak havoc, is an interesting topic and something she would like to write about. And when she does think of a new idea, she likes to plan before-hand. She wouldn’t necessarily have the whole story mapped out, but she would have a good idea. For one of her other projects, she created the stories of her two main characters before creating one main story.

You can look forward to the release of Debris the Spring of 2018!

 

Meet Jenna LaBollita!

Jenna’s passion for writing started very young, even winning her a Young Author Award in elementary school. Since then, she has written for The Odyssey and Puckermob, and has read countless books in many genres.

Her love for writing is unmatched, and she hopes to become a published author herself one day. Jenna holds an associate degree in Liberal Arts from Ocean County College in Toms River, New Jersey.

Q and A with Alec Arbogast!

Inksmith Publishing would like to offer a warm welcome to our new author Alec Arbogast, author of The Last Odinian! Below are some questions he has answered for us to help get to know him better!

Message from Alec: Hello! It’s nice to meet you. Thank you for reading, and let us share in our love of storytelling together.

Q: What is your favorite book?

A: Even though they aren’t single stories, my favorites would be The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe, and also The Great American Short Story Collection. They have both had a great impact on me. Regarding single, full-length stories, I first read The Shining by Stephen King when I was a teenager. It became a sort of catalyst for my creative mind, introducing me to the immense world of storytelling, the concept of tasteful, imaginative horror. It made me aware and reflect on the struggle between good and evil, and the grey area between the two.

Q: What is your favorite food? Favorite color?

A: My favorite color is blue, and I love Thai food.

Q: What/whom is your favorite mythical creature?

A: This is a hard answer to narrow down. Recently, I’ve been drawn to Slavic and Norse mythology. However, Medusa from Greek mythology is my overall favorite. She’s a singular, terrifying creature, who can make quick work of almost anything or anyone- even the Titans.

Q: Can you share a little of any of your current work(s) with us?

A: I have three writing projects I’m currently working on. One is an action-adventure novel revolving around an elite group of soldiers; one is a story that blends elements of time travel, mystery, and horror; and the other is a gangster drama set in post-Civil War America.

Q: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

A:  I find quite a few aspects of writing challenging, but it’s always a good challenge. I’m drawn to historical fiction, and in these stories it’s a challenge to make sure I’m accurately representing the event while also molding it to fit my narrative. Pacing is another struggle as well, as I find it tends to do one of two things: the narrative flow develops naturally or can be hard to keep on track. Almost like an intractable horse, I feel like sometimes I have to nudge it in the right direction while it wanders off.

Q: Did you learn anything from your book(s)?

A: I learned the forbearance and discipline it takes to finish a full-length book, which can be equally an exhilarating and daunting process. I stretched myself intellectually at the same time as discovering who I was as an artist and what message I’d like to be sending. I also learned the worlds you create are a tenable space in your mind and can leave a mark on your soul.

Q: What inspired you to write your first book?

A: The Last Odinian originally came to me on a whim, to be honest. I started writing it knowing the setting and atmosphere I wanted—the haunting forests of the Pacific Northwest–and developed a narrative around that (almost similar to The Twilight Zone).

Q: Do you remember how your interest in writing began?

A:  I’ve always been interested in the function of stories, and produced some short films in school with a few friends. I didn’t discover the writing form of stories until a few years ago.

Q: Do you have a specific writing style?

A: My style varies from story to story, actually. I try to find a voice that feels right with each individual story, and the characters within. I think my prose tends to have a grounding in the contemporary style while borrowing from romanticism and transcendentalism.

Q: Who is your favorite author? What really strikes you about their work?

A: I have many favorites, but I’ll try and narrow it down. On the classic side, I admire Edgar Allan Poe’s complex prose. He tackles haunting subjects, like the inescapable reality of death, in a truly singular way. Edith Wharton made me a lifetime fan based on just one of her short stories, Afterward, due to her unique style. On the contemporary side, Stephen King has influenced me with his unending creativity, and I respect his voracious need to tell stories. His characters are always vivid and three-dimensional, and he has a pragmatic approach I admire. Craig Johnson has a sort of straight-forward and laconic approach to his prose, but it’s riddled with sardonic insight.

Q: Do you have any advice for other writers?

A: Find a writing process that speaks to you. Some people prefer a meticulous preparation: a diligent outline, layers of notes detailing each character, the narrative mapped out beforehand, etc. Others prefer a more organic process wherein the narrative, characters, subplot, and all the other details just flow naturally. And these are just two examples of the compositional process- everyone develops their own process. Another tip is to be true to your story. Don’t let your own moral standards and ideologies overly influence your characters or narrative. It’s important to realize the difference between who you are and what you create within your writing. On a similar note, don’t be too concerned with your audience or their opinion of you based on your writing. Write how you want and what you want, and your creations will be truer. Finally, your final story will likely be quite different from how you originally wanted it to be, and that’s okay.

 

An Excerpt from The Last Odinian

 Seeing him in plain sight was an abhorrently different experience than through the peephole of his hotel room. Light and shadow played across Kendric’s mutilated face like a symphony of horror as he stood under the bar lights. Koenig forced the coffee down his throat and exhaled. Like a boxer caught off guard, he didn’t know whether to swing a punch or duck for cover. For a moment he just stared at the decrepit man, and the man stared right back, his one working eye fixed on Koenig. Words came to him at last, and he steadied his voice… “Any final thoughts?”

Evelyn Allen Harper Releases New Book: Essence!

Evelyn Allen Harper just published her tenth book, Essence! This mystery novel is tinged with the paranormal and filled with surprises at every turn. You can find Essence available for purchase on the Ink Smith website, or on Amazon!

We chatted with Evelyn about her current projects, what she has learned as an author, and what is behind her inspiration.

Ink Smith: What are your current projects?
Evelyn: While waiting for my current book, Essence, to be edited, I started to write a story, still with no title, in the first-person tense. I’m just sorry I hadn’t tried writing in that tense sooner.

Ink Smith: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Evelyn: 
This is an excerpt from the untitled story I’m writing while waiting for Essence to be edited.

“Buck and his gun were gone, so who was doing the shouting? The sounds were getting desperate so I ran to the cave’s opening and peeked out. There was no one out there, and all that I saw were sheets of copy paper, many with something red on them, being blown around by the wind. Where was the shouter? Moans from behind a huge tree answered my question. I cautiously crept toward the sound, peered around the tree, and screamed. The mountain lion lifted his bloody head from his prey and looked at me. I screamed again when I saw what he’d been chewing on. It was Buck.”

Ink Smith: Did you learn anything from writing your books, and what was it?Evelyn: Essence is my tenth book. In every book, there were many topics I had to look up on the Internet such as the climate of the area where the story is taking place, to the symptoms of a poisonous snake bite. Facts I pick up while writing one book, I sometimes use in another book.

Ink Smith: What inspired you to write your first book?
Evelyn: 
I have suffered from Restless Leg Syndrome most of my life. Neither of my two sisters is afflicted with it, so one night when the syndrome wouldn’t let me sleep, I sat down at the computer and started a story that had the main character, Molly, crying over her ‘crazy legs’ that wouldn’t let her stay in bed. I emailed the story to my sisters, and when they contacted me and demanded to know “What happened next?” I continued the story for six books in the Accidental Mystery Series.

Ink Smith: Is there a message in your novels that you want your readers to grasp?
Evelyn: 
The six books in the Accidental Mystery Series are filled with facts about Restless Leg Syndrome. The Nightwalker, a publication of the Restless Leg Syndrome Foundation, gave me free advertisement for my books. I picked up readers from all over the country. The next four published books are just for reading pleasure.

Ink Smith: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Evelyn: 
My advice is to just try to write and see what happens. You just might surprise yourself.

Ink Smith: If you had to do it all over again what would you change in your latest work?
Evelyn: 
I wouldn’t change the plot, but when I read the printed book, I always find many sentences that I would love to have the chance to change.

Fun facts about Evelyn: Her favorite color is red! And she loves ethnic food.

Be sure to follow Evelyn on her website: www.evelynallenharper.com!

 

About Essence

“Why are you wearing my wife’s perfume?” Laura Baker’s rescuer demanded, after
hoisting her out of the water.

Laura, a typical stay-at- home mom, is jolted out of her complacent world when she
discovers that her best friend, Joan Wilberson, is having an affair with her husband.
Banished from Laura’s life, Joan is an easy target for the escaped serial killer, George
Knox, but when George’s murderous plan is interrupted, the quiet town is thrown into
turmoil.

Broken hearted from losing both her husband and her friend, Laura is driven back to
her passion of painting and into the path of Josh Lang, a recently widowed author,
battling his own ghosts.

It isn’t until the alluring, Bob Miller, catches Laura’s eye that she thinks her life is
back on track. With no recent sightings of the dangerous convict, the small town is lulled
back to sleep, but unknown to Laura and the rest of the town, something much more
sinister is afoot.

Ink Smith Welcomes Summer Intern Jenna LaBollita

Welcome, Jenna!

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Jenna LaBollita is Ink Smith’s newest summer intern! Jenna will be working closely with the Ink Smith staff in the capacity of blogger, reader, and reviewer!

Jenna’s passion for writing started very young, even winning her a Young Author Award in elementary school. Since then, she has written for The Odyssey and Puckermob, and has read countless books in many genres.

Her love for writing is unmatched, and she hopes to become a published author herself one day. Jenna holds an associate degree in Liberal Arts from Ocean County College in Toms River, New Jersey.

 

Submissions Now Open for 2017!

It’s that time of year again! Ink Smith Publishing has opened submissions for 2017! Genres accepted can be found on our website: www.ink-smith.com/submissions. We love fantasy, so if you do not see your specific fictional genre listed, we encourage you to submit to us anyway. There are so many fiction genres (particularly hyper-specific genres) that we cannot list them all.

But, please note, we do not accept non-fiction or children’s (12 years and under) titles at Ink Smith. For non-fiction/children’s titles please submit to Native Ink Press. Guidelines and requirements apply to Native Ink Press as well.

Submission Guidelines

Submissions will be accepted January 1 – July 30 each year, with a closed reading period beginning August 1. 

  • Novellas must be 30,000 to 50,000 words and novels must be at least 50,000+ words.
  • No fan fiction.
  • No short stories.
  • Manuscripts must be polished. No first drafts or incomplete manuscripts.
  • Manuscripts that you submit cannot be previously self-published.
  • No attachments in the email.
  • No manuscripts on first query. *We will request your manuscript if we are interested in moving forward.*
  • No non-fiction titles.
  • No children’s books aimed at ages 12 and under.
  • No submissions from outside the U.S./Canada at this time.

Submit Your Book Query

Please follow ALL guidelines below. Submissions not meeting submission guidelines are automatically rejected regardless of the quality of the work submitted.

  1. Title Your email: Query, Your Last Name, Title of Your Book
  2. Cover letter: Tell us about yourself. Please include current address, as we use this to verify that you are currently residing in the U.S. or Canada.
  3. Story information: Genre, Word Count, etc.
  4. Synopsis: no longer than 1 page, please.
  5. Your marketing plan! In the event we move forward with your manuscript for publication, please note that we expect our authors to be active in the marketing of their titles alongside our efforts. Your ideas, opinions and comfort level with marketing tools are essential for us to develop a marketing plan that works for you and your book.
  6. The first three chapters of your story copied and pasted into the body of the email. (NO ATTACHMENTS)
  7. Send your query to submissions@ink-smith.com!

As a final reminder: NOT FOLLOWING GUIDELINES WILL RESULT IN AUTOMATIC REJECTION.

The NaNo Rebel

I don’t like NaNoWriMo much. I go through this same cycle every year! I promise myself every year I’m going to write a novel in a month. Maybe not 50,000 words, but a novel!

After the success of my debut novel, War and Chess, and quitting my job to become a full time author the pressure was on! This November 1st, once again, I fired up my NaNoWriMo account. (I’ve been playing this game since 2013)

Nano RebelI wasn’t sure what I was going to do but I was working on two projects. One, I am writing the first draft. If I weren’t a NaNoWriMo rebel that would have been the novel I worked on. But I like writing first drafts with pen and paper. Drafts that you can take to the mountains without worrying about it dying, as electronics are bound to do.

My second project was typing up some old stories I think might be promising as a new publication. That second project is what I chose to report to NaNoWriMo’s website. It was a lot easier than counting the words I write on paper by hand. Really, I just needed some accountability. Someone to email me when I’m making whimpy excuses about how long hours typing makes my back SCREAM. But yet, somehow, I was just fine spending most of the morning on Facebook drinking coffee…

So I was already being a rebel by not creating something new. Just making sure something great was backed up, which is my least favorite job. I wound up getting 2/3rds of the way finished with this project! I was at an awe inspiring 10,000 words by December 1st. Yeah, I didn’t join my brethren in sleep deprivation, stress, or trying to remember that when great Aunt Bessy asks you, “Have you found a man yet?” you keep your decorum and smile.

I stayed true to my nature and stayed a rebel for yet another NaNo year. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’ll be prancing around downtown in my leather jacket Christmas shopping.

 

 

About Helen

Helen M. PugsleyHelen comes from a small town of twenty in eastern Wyoming. She has been passionate about writing since she was small. Helen enjoys traveling and is always thrilled to excite friends with tales of playing music on the streets for money, conversing with the drunks who frequent gutters, and the epic struggle of finding a decent bath when living in a car. Visit her on Facebook‘s War and Chess page!

The Funeral Portrait Gets a New Cover!

If you haven’t heard yet, The Funeral Portrait by Vincent Viñas has received a facelift!

The Funeral Portrait is a fictional, literary satire packed full of humor!

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Guy doesn’t smile easily. He could be described as fundamentally glum. Tallulah doesn’t die easily. She could be described as annoyingly immortal. What if you wanted to die but were unable to? Such is the case with Guy Edwards and Tallulah Leigh, who want to end their miserable lives for different reasons. The only problem is, she’s been stricken with an unexplained (and unwelcome) case of immortality while he lacks that final, sorrowful piece of inspiration he needs to effectively do himself in. What better way to solve this dilemma than to help kill each other. However, a bigger problem has emerged–one of them is falling in love with the other. They’ll now have to decide what is a more frightening option–dying or taking one last shot at happiness? The Funeral Portrait is a very dark and comedic (but often horrific) tale about two lost souls who find each other and soon realize the only thing that may be worse than death is commitment.

Ready to read the book yet? If so, click here and get your copy today! And don’t forget, the best gift you can give a talented author is a review, so if you read Vincent’s amazing novel make sure to stop by Goodreads  and Amazon and leave a review!

 

Star Pack by Dawn Napier

Keep an eye out for our upcoming novel Star Pack by Dawn Napier, hitting the shelves December 2016! 

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The hunters have reached the stars, with the help of a remarkable mineral called the leap gem. Across the galaxy they travel, collecting scientific wisdom and harnessing the natural resources of the worlds they discover. When they discover a distant planet with gravity and oxygen similar to their own, it looks like a world ready-made for conquest. Mirra, the youngest star captain in history and possibly the most ambitious, leads her pack to the surface with the expectation of mastering and owning this new world.

She names it Otsanda, the She-Wolf.

But there are a few surprises waiting for her and her crew. The first is that the world is already inhabited by intelligent creatures, making it unfit for colonization, to Mirra’s bitter disappointment.

The second is that the two-legged inhabitants bear a striking resemblance to the Garou hunters themselves. The resemblance is so close, in fact, that the science officers wonder if the two species could be related. But that’s impossible.

The third surprise is that the natives seem to know all about the hunters. They scare each other with stories about them, about their moonlit curse and their bloodthirsty past.

They call them “werewolves.”