J. Edward Hackett

The Flight of the Ravenhawk Pre-Order Sale is Live!

Ink Smith Publishing’s Pre-Order Sale for The Flight of the Ravenhawk is live!

Get your copy reserved now!

img_3926A second-born prince. A banished elven princess. And a power-hungry Necromancer.

Kalero Tremayne is second-born Prince of the Allurian Empire and a talented wizard and scholar. Sheltered by the throne he writes boldly about the Lightdweller religion, the Wizardium, his brother, the King, and the treatment of non-magickal subjects in the kingdom. 

After distributing his writings on forbidden magick through Alluria, Kal is brought before the tribunal to face his crimes of treason against the crown. He is ordered to recant his beliefs, but Kal refuses. The punishment: Death. 

In dragon-form, King Darnashi embraces the power of the Underdark in an attempt to carry out Kal’s sentence. Forced to flee, Kal finds himself in the Ancestral Wood with, Sylvara, an elven princess outcast. While Kal learns the balance of his power, the world of Apeiron is crashing into war. 

*The pre-order sale will run until midnight on June 30th, before pricing returns to normal. All orders will ship to customers before July 7th, depending on date of order.

Advertisements

Welcome, J. Edward Hackett!

Ink Smith Publishing welcomes, author J. Edward Hackett to the Ink Smith family, with his debut novel The Flight of the Ravenhawk which will be available Spring 2019. Pre-orders will go live on the Ink Smith website in April.

J. Edward Hackett, Ph.D. is an academic philosopher at Savannah State University who rather than engage in metaphysical speculation in process metaphysics is off building magick systems in his world of Apeiron. Fantasy fiction is itself an exploration of concepts in extreme for him. In fantasy this exploration is limited only by the imagination in much the same way that philosopher employs the intellectual imagination to solve problems that science, common sense, religion, or art cannot solve on their own.

In his debut novel, Flight of the Ravenhawk, Apeiron is a world as boundless as its origin coming from Anaximander’s fragments. Wizard nobles vie for power in the Allurian Empire. Airships shoot lightning cannons. Elven archers fly atop griffins, and a dwarven kingdom is buried deep in the mountains far from elven or human spires. At the same time, Ed’s fiction cannot help but be inspired and instantiated by concepts that come from ancient, modern, and 19th and 20th philosophical systems of thought. It’s in his blood.

Ed grew up scattered across the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. Born in Lakewood, NJ and spending most of his life north of Pittsburgh, PA, Ed has been traveling to other worlds since he bought the Star Wars D6 RPG book by West End Games and Mage: the Ascension from White Wolf as a teenager. He grew up on Magic the Gathering, 80s fantasy movies, and many comics of the 90s amidst the rust belt of Western Pennsylvania.

Although a professor, Ed still goes to imaginary worlds with his friends at the age of 39. He’s in a classic AD&D game. His philosophizing meshes with the sensitivity to imaginary worlds. Just recently, he contributed an article about environmental ethics and the animated movie Wall-E in the upcoming Disney and Philosophy. He’s edited another pop culture and philosophy volume called House of Cards and Philosophy, co-edited an academic volume on phenomenology entitled Phenomenology for the 21st Century. He also published his first solo academic book called Persons and Values in Pragmatic Phenomenology (2018).  When asked if she was a philosopher once, the great Simone De Beauvoir said, “No, I’m a writer.” Upon hearing that many years ago, Ed has tried to write for many audiences and emulate her example.

Ed has been married to his wife, Ashley, since July 30th 2016. They live in Savannah, a magickal place in its own right and before that they lived in Cleveland. They have two cats: Olive and Lulu. Ed absorbs the sunlight of the beach, practices zazen, and while writing and teaching philosophy and other courses in the humanities, he shoots landscape photography. Despite all of this, his greatest joy is teaching and writing. “Writing fiction is simply being philosophical with narratives rather than directly talking about concepts.”