Grey Stone Available for Pre-order!

Grey Stone by Jean Knight Pace and Jacob Kennedy is finally up for pre-order! While you wait for your copy, check out these amazing terms created by the authors for the YA dystopian, fantasy novel! In addition, take a peek at the map of the world focused on the Motteral Mal!

Grey Stone Map.jpg

Terms:

Veranderen (Vər-an-dər-ən). The Veranderen are the wolf-shifters. This word refers to them as a people and as the plural. Generally, they are able to shift at will and have strong magical abilities. They are the ruling class.

-Verander—Singular

-Veranderah—Feminine (singular)

Blødguard (Blewd-gard). The lowest class of wolves, starved so they will hunt humans after dark.

Königsvaren (Kəh-nigs-vah-rən). The wolf class that forms the king’s guard.

Motteral (mah-tər-ahl). The hill on which the Sourcestone was once placed. The highest point in the land.

Motteral Mal (mah-tər-al mahl). The tournament held among the Veranderen every hundred years at the summer solstice.

Shining Grey (shi-ning gray). The metal that can weaken or harm Veranderen

Verlorn (vər-lorn). A Verander without magic.

Wolken (wohl-kən). The wolvish form of the Veranderen.

Septugant (sep-tu-gahnt). Those who wish to rebel against the king and usher in a 7th Era.

Mördare (mərh-dah-ray). The half-life assassins the king uses to protect his treasure.

Rotherem (roth-ər-əm). An herb that can mask a wolf’s scent.

Pallium (pal-ee-um). A metal that can contain or deflect energy.

River Rylen (Ri-lən. ‘I’ long as in kite). Main river in land.

Zonnesteen (zohn-ə-stayn. The ‘A’ makes long ‘a’ sound as in stain). The stone of the sun.

Steenmacht (stayn-mohkt). The place where that stone can be empowered.

 

Pronunciation Guide for Grey Stone

Are you ready for the dystopitan, YA werewolf fantasy Grey Stone? Well make sure you check out the pronunciation guide for all the characters before your copy arrives!

Grey Stone CoverCharacter Name Pronunciation Guide

Zinnegael (Zin-ə-gayl. The ‘ae’ form a long ‘A’ sound)

Savanh (Sah-vah)

Pietre (Pee-ay-tray)

Crespin (Kres-pin)

Grender (Gren-dər)

Wittendon (Wit-tən-don)

Kaxon (Kax-on)

Wolrijk (Wohl-rike. The ij form a long ‘I’ sound as it kite)

Hannah (ha-nah)

Carina (Car-ee-nah)

Jager (Jay-gher)

Humphrey (Hum-free)

Sarak (Say-rək)

Sadora (Sah-doh-rah)

Koll (kohl)

Tomar (Toh-mar)

Naden (Nay-dən)

Loerwoei (Loor-way or Loor-ə-way)

Draden (Dray-dən)

Markhi (Mark-hi. Long ‘I’ sound as in kite)

Winterby (Win-tər-bee)

Zinder (Zin-dər)

Rorof (Rohr-off)

Dorak (Dohr-ack)

Gog (Gahg)

Silva (Sil-vah)

Ellza (El-zah)

Borl (Borl)

Emie (Ee-mee)

Damiott (Day-mee-ot. The ‘O’ is short as in shot)

Peigh (Pay)

Quidin (Qui-din. Both ‘I’s are short as in bib)

Submissions Update

Good afternoon writers!

Please note, Ink Smith Publishing will be closing submissions on August 1, 2016 and beginning our reading period. Submissions will reopen January 1, 2017. All submissions received prior to August 1, 2016 will be evaluated during the reading period (Aug. 1 – Dec. 31). Any submissions received after August 1 will not be considered until next year’s reading period.

Please stay tuned for updates regarding submissions and our upcoming ISP Book Awards which will launch its submission process August 1!

Enjoy your summer!

New Ink Smith Release!

It’s almost here! Grey Stone by Jean Knight Pace and Jacob Kennedy is coming to you July 28, 2016! This Teen/Young Adult novel is one of the newest editions to the Ink Smith family. This fantasy novel takes a unique twist on the werewolf legend and myths surrounding them.

Jean Knight Pace and Jacob Kennedy have created a world in which werewolves rule, dogs sing and humans serve – all under the constant light of the red sun.

Grey Stone Cover.jpg

In the land of the great red sun, wolf-shifters reign—able to wield magic and shift form at will while privileged wolves serve them. Dogs rove through the woods in packs speaking, singing, and scavenging—afraid to befriend the humans who live repressed. As the lowest of all four races, the humans work at mines, fashion metals, and send over half their gains to the wolf-shifting king.

However, when Pietre, an impoverished human boy, finds an unusual, orphaned pup in the woods, the wolf-shifting prince is sent to arrest his father. It’s then that boy and prince begin to realize that obeying the rules might be just as dangerous as breaking them. Unfortunately, breaking the rules means they’ll have to learn to work together if they want to change their world before it turns on them.

Stay tuned for the link to pre-order this new YA fantasy novel!

Writing Interesting Beginnings

As an author we want our readers to be sucked into the worlds that we painstakingly develop. We don’t want them to be on the other side of the glass looking in, but to be immersed within it. We are immersed, so why is it that we occasionally see these types of faces staring at our books?

whatcha_reading

Well, it may be because we are slow to start. I am guilty of this in every first, second and even third draft of my own works. I call it: Author Information Vomit. Lovely name, I know but it reminds me of word vomit – and it has a bit of a Mean Girls connection. How you can find yourself unable to keep all the words you should, or should not be saying contained. It just kind of spills out of you. That is exactly what happens with a lot of authors who are focused on world building and character background. This is not to say that your world building/character background isn’t important, but placing it all at the forefront is just information overload for the reader.

Rule of thumb: beginnings should be interesting. Easy, right? Nope. Interesting is important, but as the author you have to make sure that the “interesting” thing happening, is a) appropriate to the story line, b) fits the timeline, c) doesn’t give too much away, and d) propels the story forward towards the main conflict and resolution.

As a side note, I do try to avoid prologues when possible — a lot of the time they aren’t necessary, and may set up your readers for a different kind of story. But use your judgement!

My best advice during the writing process is to write down everything that comes to mind. Everything. Leave it there for the first edit. At the second edit, step back and try to read it as if you have never read your book before and evaluate; don’t take huge chunks out until you have read the whole draft twice. Finally, let yourself read novel and make your cuts. It can hurt to delete beautiful lines, or great paragraphs full of background information. To ease the blow of “killing your darlings,” copy and paste the larger and more beautiful lines that you are cutting. Save them in a separate document in case you can utilize that information later on!

The editing process is a slow, dark and oftentimes unfair process where writers question their motivation to follow through to the polished manuscript. I urge you to follow through, it will absolutely, 100 percent be worth it in the end.

Keep on writing, editing and killing your darlings – your novel will be better off with a savagely determined captain at the helm.

 

 

Corinne can be reached at AndersonEditingServices@gmail.com

Connect with me on Twitter! @AndersonCorinne

Corinne is an editor at Ink Smith Publishing. Since her first trip to the library when she was a toddler, Corinne has been collecting books, recommending her favorites and providing commentary on the less-than-stellar. Her belief is that if you have a problem, it’s nothing that a good book can’t solve. She holds her MFA in Creative Writing from Lindenwood University, and is currently pursuing her MPS in Publishing at George Washington University. She hopes that her experience editing and her blog posts here will help writers improve and publish their work.

Book Signing At Niobrara County Library for War & Chess

If you are in the area of Niobrara County Library in Lusk, Wyoming, then make sure to stop by and meet Helen M. Pugsley and grab a copy of her debut novel War & Chess! She’ll even sign it for you. Helen will be at the library on Wednesday, August 3, 2016 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm!

“Come see me on your way to the county fair!” Helen said.

For more information, check out the event page on Facebook here, or you can check out the library’s webpage. Helen hopes to see you there!

Niobrara County Library
425 S Main St, Lusk, Wyoming 82225

S.A. Check at Sci-Fi Valley Con!

Our author S.a. Check is heading to the SciFiValley Convention in Altoona this weekend! He’ll be hanging out at the American Mythology Booth. Make sure to stop by and say hello if you’re there! He’ll be signing copies of Maxx Fragg, VPI!!

Sci-Fi Valley Con is a convention aimed to enhance the community by providing a high quality, family oriented convention showcasing the work of many talented individuals. The convention will be held June 10-12 at the Blair County Convention Center in Altoona, PA.

For more information about the convention, visit www.scifivalleycon.com.

Meet Jean Knight Pace

Jean Knight Pace

Jean Knight Pace joined the Ink Smith Family with her book Grey Stone, with her co-writer Jacob Kennedy, after they won the 2015 ISP Book Award. She has had essays and short stories published in Puerto del Sol, The Lakeview Review, and other literary magazines. She lives in Indiana with her husband, four children, 6 ducks, and a cat. You can find more about her at jeanknightpace.com. Or writing about food at tastycheapskate.blogspot.com.

In addition to her website you can follow Jean on Facebook, Twitter @jeanknightpace, Goodreads and even Instagram!

 

 

 

 

 

Arguing With Your Editor

You’ve written that last sentence and completed the manuscript you have been working on for seven years. You submit to your dream publisher and a few days later you get THE publication offer. Dreams do come true!

The email comes from your editor with some details about the contract, royalties, information about cover design and the sentence, “I made some notes.”

Notes, of course, you think, I must have missed a few typos. Still on your high from all the wondrous things happening you open up the attached manuscript with “some notes” and need to blink a few times.

RED.

RED EVERYWHERE.

Are you sure about this title?

Her green emerald eyes stared up at me from the pillows on the floor. (How did they get on the floor?)

My heart stopped. cliché, get creative!

 

My advice to you at this moment: Breathe. Read the comments. Then, read the comments again. Sometimes there is praise amidst the notes, comments and corrections!

Editors are not out to destroy you work. In my experience it is never our intention to do so. The reason we offered you a contract is because we saw a spark of genius in what you sent us. We want the book(s) to succeed just as much as you do, so make sure to review all comments with an open mind before discarding the changes or the comments.

There will be some instances where you want a particular sentence to stay where it is. Instead of demanding that it stay there, support your reason why it needs to be there. Occasionally, a great sounding line just isn’t properly placed, or needed. If you can’t defend the line’s necessity, reevaluate if it really adds anything to the story. Get familiar with the: Kill your darlings phrase. Does another line before or after this absolutely gorgeous line say the same thing? Does it paint a picture, or tell us what is happening? Editing is not just typos, grammar or elimination of overly used adverbs. It comes down to the nitty-gritty of the plot, character development, believability.

Make sure to pick your battles – and this goes for the editors out there, too! For example, I dislike the Oxford comma. I’ve had writers who LOVE the Oxford comma. Is it grammatically incorrect either way? No. Will I delete every comma and tell them it can’t be in there? No. I pick my battles.

I battle when I know the author has more in them then: The handsome man turned and stared at her. What do you mean by handsome, how was he staring? Or maybe the timeline doesn’t add up enough – and changes need to occur there. The note I most often make, is when a character starts losing his/her voice – a gentle reminder to the author to strengthen that character so he/she doesn’t fade into the background is something I’ll fight for as an editor. But if, as an editor I make changes and alter the voice into something not like the character – the author should say something, kindly so that we can assess the situation.

Open lines of communication are essential. Writers, this is your story and the editors want you to tell it. But choose your battles – the comma in paragraph four on page ninety-four is not the end of the world, normally. But if it is, be able to defend it!

 

(House style may trump the writer, so make sure to discuss that with your editors.)

Keep your wits about you as you enter into the editing process, it is long and grueling, and your only ally is your editor.

 

 

Corinne can be reached at AndersonEditingServices@gmail.com

Connect with me on Twitter! @AndersonCorinne

Corinne is an editor at Ink Smith Publishing. Since her first trip to the library when she was a toddler, Corinne has been collecting books, recommending her favorites and providing commentary on the less-than-stellar. Her belief is that if you have a problem, it’s nothing that a good book can’t solve. Currently, she is pursuing her MFA in Creative Writing at Lindenwood University, editing for Ink Smith Publishing and hoping that her blog posts here will help writers improve and publish their work.

Fun Facts with Ashley Townsend

Fact 1: I’m actually pretty uninteresting, so this might be a difficult list.

Fact 2: I have a fear of clowns, but I considered going to clown college as a kid.

Fact 3: I enjoy doing some things the old-fashioned way because I have an intense fascination with history and the past—take my series, for example—and have a growing collection of records. Music is an event to be enjoyed! Much like cookies.

Fact 4: One day you WILL find me writing in my little cottage in Ireland with my dog, Shadow, and my cat, Sir Arthur Doyle.

Fact 5: I’m also bad at math, which is why there are only four items on this list. . . . Though I guess this makes it five, so yay!

 

Meet the Author

Ashley TownsendAshley Townsend, author of Chasing Shadows, is a young twenty-something who has been spinning tales since she discovered that her wild imagination and love of storytelling could make a career. Reading and writing are her way of experiencing grand adventures from home, and she hopes that others will join in her fantastical escapades! She is a native to bookstores, coffee shops, the kitchen, and Southern California. She also has an unexplainable aversion to clowns and describes outlines as a “proverbial noose.” The final book in the Rising Shadows trilogyDefying Shadows, will release in spring of 2016. Make sure to connect with Ashley at www.ashley-townsend.com!

You can also find Ashley on other social media platforms:
Goodreads: Ashley Townsend
Twitter: @TownsendTales
Facebook: Ashley Townsend Author
Pinterest: TownsendTales